The woes of being blind

Blind coordination and frequency

People who are blind depend on their other senses to go on their day to day lives. Taste, odor, touch, sound, and even instinct, though you may argue the latter is not part of our senses.
Today I awoke with a cold, sore throat, runny nose, left ear full of pressure.
Now, to a normal person that’s nothing but annoying, but to a blind person it can be argued a cold is actually dangerous.
When a blind person is familiar with his surroundings, he doesn’t need a guide dog or any help to move around. For example, inside my house, I know where everything is, everyone is, what’s on the stove. From the sounds, scents, and the position of which the sound came from. I can tell when someone is talking to me while looking on the opposite direction, if my kids are standing or sitting when they speak to me – all from the position of the sound.
So when there’s pressure in my ear (the left one), it means I hear better from my right, so naturally, I become disoriented. The door that should have been to the left is now to the right, and POW! I crash into it. It’s also easier to poison a blind person with a sore throat, because the sense of taste? Practically useless. Starvation is also a possibility.
My mother always tells me that the eyes eat first, but if that’s true, I don’t know why the entire world hasn’t gone blind.
And if the house suddenly starts burning down? I can’t really smell it now, can I?
Usually when I develop a cold, I tell people I have no frequency. The screen is out, the sound is often too low, requiring people to keep repeating themselves.
So you see, a simple cold to me means the loss of frequency and coordination.

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26 Replies to “The woes of being blind”

      1. I would like to say that you are admirable as you do not let your visual impairment stop or prevent you from writing. Keep the will and tenacity going Jina! I am happy to know of you and enjoy your posts. Have a lovely day 😉 Garfield hugs

        Liked by 1 person

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